• Home
  • /The Crunch
  • /Egypt finds new clues that Queen Nefertiti may lie buried behind Tut's Tomb

Egypt finds new clues that Queen Nefertiti may lie buried behind Tut's Tomb

Mar 22, 2016 The Egyptian ministry of antiquities recently unearthed new clues that a secret chamber exists behind the tomb of King Tutankhamun, which is believed by some to be the lost burial site of Queen Nefertiti.

Nefertiti, who died in the 14th century B.C, is thought to be Tutankhamun’s stepmother and has been the subject of a lot of international interest. According to experts, confirmation of her final resting place will be the most remarkable Egyptian archaeological discovery of the century.

Mamdouh Al DamatyEgypt finds new clues that Queen Nefertiti may lie buried behind Tut's Tomb

Speaking at a news conference, Mamdouh al-Damaty, Egyptian Minister of Antiquity, said an analysis of radar scans done on the King Tutankhamun’s burial site revealed the presence of two empty spaces behind two walls in King Tut’s chamber.

“In the north wall of the burial chamber, exactly in the middle here, you can see, that you have already different results from the two sides of the wall, what it means, it means the wall here is different than this one, also behind the wall is different than this one, to compare with the first scan of the east side of the chamber, we can say here we have solid and here we have empty space,”

Mamdouh Al DamatyEgypt finds new clues that Queen Nefertiti may lie buried behind Tut's Tomb

Damaty went on to say that a more advanced scan will be conducted at the end of this month with an international research team to confirm whether the empty spaces are in fact chambers.

“After the analysis of this photo in Japan, they tell us that we have here some different things behind the wall… that we have here some different materials, could be metal, could be organic,”

The discovery could be a win for Egypt’s ailing tourism industry, which has suffered endless setbacks since an uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011.

British Egyptologist, Nicholas Reeves, who is leading the investigation, said he believes that Tutankhamun’s mausoleum was originally occupied by Nefertiti and that she lies undisturbed behind a partition wall.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*